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Aberrational, Heretical, Heterodox, Suborthodox or UnorthodoxGrey Zone, Unsure, or Offkey Friends of the Eucharist

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Organization in New Hampshire, USA, set up by Ronald J. O'Brien (known, until 1995, as "Ronald Woodruff, who served 13 months in a federal prison for credit-card fraud, stealing $300,000." - source). He claims to defend "true Catholicism." He also claims religious statues in his house ooze oil, and that thousands of communion wafers - "stained with the blood of Christ" - have mysteriously appeared in his home.

On Monday, the state police laboratory concluded in its report that the red "blood" stains actually were dye. And The Keene Sentinel has reported that O'Brien ordered thousands of communion wafers from two mail-order companies.
No charges for false prophet, Concord Monitor/The Keene Sentinel, Jan. 27, 2000

Ronald J. O'Brien is a cult leader, two experts say, and people should worry about where he's leading his followers. Citing the tragic ends of some cults in recent years, Rick A. Ross of Phoenix, Ariz., and Joseph Nickell of Buffalo, N.Y. -- both authorities on cults -- say that what they've seen in the writings, pronouncements and warnings of the 55-year-old Keene man are cause for concern.
(...)

Ross and Nickell worry that O'Brien shows characteristics of a cult leader:
  • He's a self-proclaimed prophet.
  • He purports that miracles occur in his home.
  • He predicts a heavenly warning, a mass healing, and Armageddon.
  • He condemns those who disagree with him.
  • He instructs members of his organization, Friends of the Eucharist, to form a religious army, The Sons of Light, and hunker down in northern New Hampshire to defend true Catholicism.
Cult experts are alarmed by Keene prophet's case, The Keene Sentinel (New Hampshire), Jan. 14, 2000

O'Brien is a false prophet.

There was no heavenly sign in the sky between Jan. 19 and 31. There was no dark cross suspended in the stratosphere, as O'Brien had said there would be. No one reported seeing his soul "as God does."

But followers of O'Brien, 55, a self-proclaimed prophet, couldn't care less about his failed prophecy.
No signs, no crosses: Prophecy is unfulfilled, The Keene Sentinel, Feb. 6, 2000

Nevertheless, he continues to make predictions:

O'Brien's next prophecy is for April 13 in Garabandal, Spain. All gathered there on that day will be healed of all infirmity and disability, the prophecy goes.
(...)

After April will come Armageddon, according to O'Brien. He says that, if the world does not turn to God and follow true Catholicism, which O'Brien asserts is the only true religion, 4 billion people will die.
No signs, no crosses: Prophecy is unfulfilled, The Keene Sentinel, Feb. 6, 2000

According to The Keene Sentinel, O'Brien is now living in Kiltimagh, Ireland.

- News Database -

» Database of archived news items on Friends of the Eucharist
(Includes items added between Oct. 25, 1999 and Jan. 31, 2002. See about this database)

- Sites -
Aberrational, Heretical, Heterodox, Suborthodox or Unorthodox Friends of the Eucharistoffsite Official site



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