Hizb ut-Tahrir – Deceptive

Hizb ut-Tahrir has been known to use deception in it recruitment and training efforts.

A leading radical Islamist group which Tony Blair wants to ban is recruiting “vulnerable” young Muslim students at British universities under several cover names, The Independent on Sunday can reveal.

Hizb ut-Tahrir, banned from campuses by the National Union of Students, has set up front organisations at more than a dozen universities with innocuous-sounding names such as the Ideological Society, the Millennium Forum and the New World Society.

They have secured access to freshers’ fairs across the country and will receive funding from student unions to help them operate. Muslim student leaders warned that Hizb would target “vulnerable” young Muslims when the new university term starts later this month.

“Before, we could stop the recruitment; we could save vulnerable people,” said Faisal Hanjra, a spokesman for the Federation of Student Islamic Societies. “Now, we have no idea who is targeting whom.” Hizb failed to respond when approached for comment.

– Source: Islamic group in secret plan to recruit UK students, The Independent, Sep. 4, 2005

A hardline Islamist group attempted to book a conference at a Quaker meeting house by disguising itself as a Latin American dance organisation.

Hizb-ut-Tahrir, which Tony Blair plans to ban as an extremist organisation, had booked Friends Meeting House in Central London using the name Salsa Bill Publishing House.

The group, which describes itself as a non-violent political party seeking to establish an Islamic state, had called a national conference to be attended by 1,000 followers on Sunday. But the Quakers said yesterday that they had cancelled the booking and refunded the fee because they were unhappy that insufficient details and contact information had been provided.

A Quaker spokeswoman said: “We are a pacifist movement and any group which books with us is expected to follow our guidelines.”

– Source: Hardliners try to lead Quakers a merry dance, Times Online, Sep. 1, 2005