Inclusivism / Inclusionism

Inclusivism claims that one religion is explicitly true, while all others are implicitly true and that God accepts an ‘implicit’ faith in lieu of explicit faith in Christ. That while there is no salvation outside of Jesus Christ, that He will extend His mercy to many who lead moral lives but may have incomplete, or no knowledge of Him in this present life.

Religious Pluralism, Universalism, Exclusivism and Inclusivism,



[I]nclusivism posits that even though the work of Christ is the only means of salvation, it does not follow that explicit knowledge of Christ is necessary in order for one to be saved. In contrast to pluralism, inclusivism agrees with exclusivism in affirming the particularity of salvation in Jesus Christ. But unlike exclusivism, inclusivism holds that an implicit faith response to general revelation can be salvific. God expects from man a response proportional to the light given. Saving faith is not characterized so much by its cognitive content as it is by its reverent quality.

None Dare Call It Treason: Is an Inclusivist a Paul Revere or a Benedict Arnold?PDF file By Ken Keathley, Assistant Professor of Theology and Philosophy, New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary. From the Journal for Baptist Theology and Ministry Vol. 1 No. 2 (Fall 2003): 101-114


See Also

Religion News Blog research resource Exclusivism
Religion News Blog research resource Religious Pluralism
Religion News Blog research resource Universalism

This post was last updated: Mar. 2, 2011