Andrew Weil

Andrew Weil is a popular teacher and writer on holistic health.

Some (including the Encyclopaedia Britannica) refer to him as a “guru of alternative medicine,” and the moniker stuck.

He advocates that patients combine what he calls ‘Western’ medicine — essentially evidence-based medicine as prescribed by doctors with alternative therapies, such as dosages of vitamins and herbs, but also spiritual approaches including meditation.

This approach — known as integrative medicine, or integrative health — concerns Christians who do not with to get involved with treatments based on religious beliefs and New Age concepts that they consider to be incompatible with Christianity.

According to the Wikipedia entry on Weil,

Some have criticized Weil for promoting unverified beliefs. Weil’s rejection of some aspects of evidence-based medicine and promotion of alternative medicine practices that are not verifiably efficacious has been criticized by noted physicians such as Arnold S. Relman, editor in chief emeritus of The New England Journal of Medicine, in his 1998 article “A Trip to Stonesville: Some Notes on Andrew Weil”

We include an entry on Andrew Weil in the Apologetics Index because we regularly receive questions regarding his claims and spiritual teachings.



  • Examining Alternative Medicine: An Inside Look at the Benefits & Risks, by medical doctor Paul Reisser, former alternative health care practitioner Dale Mabe and writer Robert Velarde. The book can be downloaded from Apologetics Index free of charge.

    Chapter 8 of this book deals with Andrew Weil. The authors say that

    a review of his favorite themes would suggest that Dr. Weil may not be quite as evenhanded as he portrays himself to be. His strongest agendas do not spring from a typical medical career—his track has been anything but conventional—but rather from a lifelong interest in altered states of consciousness. […]

    He defines himself as an “open-minded skeptic” when assessing various alternative therapies, although “selective skeptic” might be a more accurate characterization.

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This post was last updated: Feb. 11, 2013