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NXIVM / Executive Success Programs



Quick Facts on NXIVM

Also known as Executive Success Programs, NXIVM is a company offering courses in the development of human potential.

It uses methods created by Keith Raniere, NXIVM's founder, called "Rational Inquiry" technology which Raniere has been trying to patent since 2000. He has said his program is a practice based on how the mind handles data with a goal of ethical behavior.

The program can by purchased like a health club membership to include weekly classes that run year-round, called Ethos, costing about $1,800 annually. Hundreds of modules are offered with names such as "Work and Value" or "Parasite Producing." Students must sign a confidentiality agreement to not share materials, methods and information.

Besides the Ethos program, NXIVM offers "intensives" of 16 days, costing about $7,500, where people work from 8 a.m. to 9 p.m.; or for five days, costing about $2,700. VIP intensives can run as much as $10,000 for the five-day program. Also, one-on-one "EMs", or exploration of meaning, sessions are encouraged to concentrate on "issues" a person may be dealing with, such as relationships.

NXIVM promotional material describes its "school" as a place to help people develop consistent ways of approaching goals by changing the way students think, make decisions and react.

Students are instructed that all adults have "disintegrations" because they learned to understand the world from the perspective of a small child and NXIVM courses help people to re-examine beliefs.

Sashes of different colors are assigned to NXIVM participants to denote rank, similar to martial arts.
- Source: James M. Odato, What is NXIVMoffsite, Albany Times Union, Feb. 20, 2012

The introduction to NXIVM quoted above is a part of a series of investigative reports on NXIVM published by the Times Union (Albany, New York).

The newspapers has published many articles on controversies related to the organization. Some observers consider NXIVM to be, sociologically, a cult.

In November 2010 the Times Union reported

In court papers filed Friday, a former high ranking officer of NXIVM depicts the cultlike group as a self-help and ethics school that is secretly a place for its leader to explore opportunities for sex and gambling money.

Susan Dones, a trainer who ran the Colonie-based company's former Tacoma, Wash., center, told a bankruptcy court last week that Keith A. Raniere, the creator of the teachings used in NXIVM's self-improvement courses, may have motives beyond the education of human potential.

Dones said NXIVM presents Raniere "as the most honest, ethical, Nobel (sic), man who had the answers to mankind's problems" yet his training sessions are "used as a venue to stalk their students ... who might fit into Raniere's profile of sexual conquest and who might be willing to 'give' Raniere money to feed his gambling problem." [...]
- Source: James M. Odato, Ex-NXIVM trainer: Students are preyoffsite Times Union, Nov. 22, 2010


Note: Buyer beware! In the process of researching NXIVM keep our cautionary information regarding 'cult experts' in mind. If you find yourself in need of a cult expert we suggest you contact the International Cultic Studies Association.


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Apologetics Index research resource Self Help / Success Coaches

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Footnotes

  1. Cult of Personality, Forbes, Oct. 13, 2006
  2. What is NXIVM?offsite official website. Last accessed Tuesday, February 21, 2012 - 10:54 AM CET
  3. NXIVMoffsite Wikipedia. Last accessed Tuesday, February 21, 2012 - 11:07 AM CET
  4. Various media reports. See
  5. Ex-NXIVM student: 'I think it's a cult,' James M. Odato, Times Union, Sep. 7, 2010

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This post was last updated: Feb. 26, 2012