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Witchcraft Goes Mainstream, by Brooks Alexander



Pages In This Entry:

  1. Witchcraft Goes Mainstream, by Brooks Alexander
  2. About the Author, Brooks Alexander
  3. The Contemporary Relevance of 'Witchcraft Goes Mainstream'
  4. Witchcraft Goes Mainstream: Copyright and Additional Information
  5. Witchcraft Goes Mainstream -- Table of Contents
  6. A Note on Terms and Capitalization
  7. Introduction: My Encounters With Modern Witchcraft
  8. Chapter 1: "Witchcraft," "Neopaganism": What Are We Talking About, Exactly?
  9. Chapter 2: The Halloween Witch is Dead: The Changing Face of Modern Witchcraft
  10. Chapter 3: Teens and the Media: Witchcraft in Popular Entertainment
  11. Chapter 4: Witchcraft in Popular Entertainment: The Craft, Buffy and Beyond
  12. Chapter 5: Three Myths about Modern Witchcraft
  13. Chapter 6: Witchcraft for Real -- Was There or Wasn't There?
  14. Chapter 7: From Witchcraft to Wicca: 1700 -- 2000
  15. Conclusion: Witchcraft, Christianity and Cultural Change
  16. A Final Word From the Author: What Now?
  17. Appendix A: Witchcraft in the Military
  18. Appendix B: A Brief Annotated Bibliography for Further Reading
  19. Witchcraft Goes Mainstrain -- Bibliography

Next page:

The publishers of Apologetics Index have received permission from Brooks Alexander to post online the full text of his book, Witchcraft Goes Mainstream

Witchcraft Goes Mainstream

While the book is currently out of print it continues to be valuable in providing Christians with accurate information about Neopaganism and Witchcraft.

Neopaganism has become one of the fastest-growing religious movements today. Christians are not immune from its influence. Witchcraft and occultism are knocking on the doors of American homes, gaining acceptance and prominence in media and advertising, and enticing people of all ages to dabble in deceptive and dangerous practices.

Believers are asking,

  • Is witchcraft just a passing fad? Is it a revival of ancient pagan traditions?
  • Do witches worship Satan? What do they believe?
  • How should Christians respond to witchcraft?
  • What do I say to my teenage daughter who wants to experiment with witchcraft?

    Brooks Alexander offers lucid and enlightening descriptions of witchcraft today and our culture's acceptance of it. He concludes by helping Christians formulate a reasonable response.

    In his introduction to Withcraft Goes Mainstream, Alexander writes:

    This book, I hope, will help Christians to understand some of the changes that have already occurred -- and to prepare for the rest of them before they actually arrive. To cope with the challenges before us, Christians not only need to understand Neopaganism, we must also be prepared to engage it. On a personal level, we must understand Neopaganism in order to guard our families from its influence; we must also be prepared to engage Neopaganism should it nevertheless appear within the family sanctum.

    On a cultural level, we need to actively counter the false picture of Christianity that Neopagans often present, as well as countering the false history it is based on. On a spiritual level, we must be able to actively present the gospel message to the Neopagan community in terms that they can hear and understand.

    But before we can take the truth to Neopagans, we must first understand the truth about them. We need to know who we are talking to before the conversation starts. We owe them that respect in order to gain a hearing for the message that we bear.

    Unlike many books and articles on the subject written from a Christian perspective, this book is noted for its faithful, factual representation of what Neopagans believe.

    In the words of one Neopagan reviewer, "It is exceedingly well written by someone who is as knowledgeable in NeoPaganism as many of our current Elders, and many of the Founders of NeoPaganism and Wicca as well."

    About the author

    Brooks Alexander is the founder of the Spiritual Couterfeits Project (SCP), an evangelical ministry and think-tank in Berkeley, California that studies new religions and spiritual movements. An experienced journalist who is educated in law, his personal experience in the occult and his subsequent conversion to Christ give him a unique perspective on current spiritual trends. In 1998, after almost a quarter century of work in the ministry he founded, Alexander retired from active participation in SCP. He currently works as an independent writer and editor.

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    This post was last updated: Oct. 26, 2011