The terms Nazi and Nazism are

derived from the German for the National Socialist German Worker’s Party, the fascist political party founded in 1919 and abolished in 1945. Under Adolf Hitler is seized control of Germany in 1933.

The Associated Press Stylebook, Perseus Publishing, 2002. Page 172.

The term Neo-Nazism refers to any social, political and/or (quasi) religious movement seeking to revive Nazism or Fascism.

Neo-Nazi groups are racist hate groups that pattern themselves after Hitler’s philosophies. Examples include: Aryan Nations, National Alliance


  • How did neo-Nazi prison gangs become so powerfuloffsite BBC News magazine, Apr. 4, 2013

    Three US justice officials who tackled white supremacist prison gangs have been killed. Originally formed to fight other gangs, these groups are now accused of a range of criminal activities on the outside, from drug smuggling and kidnapping to murder. How did neo-Nazi prisoners set up huge criminal networks?

  • Why Germany Isn’t Rooting Out its Neo-Nazisoffsite Commentary by David Crossland, editor of Spiegel Online (the international edition of German news weekly Der Spiegel)

    Far-right violence against immigrants has become endemic in parts of Germany and that won’t change anytime soon. The public and the police are too often indifferent to extremism, despite the risk it poses to the country’s reputation. Deep down, Germany still hasn’t grasped that it needs to embrace its minorities.


Christian New Religions and the Nazis by Karla Poewe. Description at “Karla Poewe illuminates an important but neglected part of Nazi history: the contribution of new religions to the emergence of Nazi ideology in 1930s Germany. Looking at traditional German occultism as well as the established Church, this book takes new religions founded in the pre-Nazi and Nazi years, especially Jakob Hauer’s German Faith Movement, as indicators of how German fascism distilled aspects of religious doctrine into political extremism. It is researched from original documents, including the SS personnel files held in Berlin’s Bundesarchiv.”

Poewe’s book is dense and difficult, not a word wasted. Its importance lies in its suitability as a lens through which we may view, with great uneasiness, conditions in Europe today. Hitler and Co. didn’t survive World War II, but Hauer and many other neo-pagan leaders and thinkers did. Under new names, using new terminology, their organizations and publishing houses have remained active to this day. In light of recent events, such as the nationwide Muslim riots in France, we observe that there are many elements of the European scene today that, if combined in just the right way, could produce an explosion. […] “While the constitutions of western liberal democracies preserve the freedom of new religions, I am not sure whether new religions, including New Age and neo-paganism, preserve western liberal democracies. In Weimar [Germany] they did not.”
– Source:
A Review of New Religions and the Nazis Chalcedon Report, Feb. 21, 2006

News and News Archives

Religion News Blog research resource Neo-Nazism newstracker at Religion News Blog

Religion News Blog research resource Database of archived news items (Includes items added between Oct. 25, 1999 and Jan. 31, 2002._

See Also

Religion News Blog research resource Hate Groups
Religion News Blog research resource White Supremacy

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This post was last updated: Apr. 11, 2013