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Cosmic Ordering Service



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The Cosmic Ordering Service is a new age belief thought up by German author Bärbel Mohr. The basic idea is that you can ask the 'cosmos' for just about anything you want, and your wish will be granted.

Mohr first presented her ideas in her magazine Sonnenwind (Solor Wind). In 1998, she published, "Bestellungen beim Universum. Ein Handbuch zur Wunscherf├╝llung." An English-language version was published in 2001: The Cosmic Ordering Service: A Guide To Realizing Your Dreams (Amazon UK).

The book received fresh publicity when British radio host Noel Edmonds recently credited the Cosmic Ordering Service with - among other things - the revival of his career":

If you, like so many of us, have a heart's desire, you may have to wait a fortnight before you get it. In a couple of weeks, a book called The Cosmic Ordering Service arrives in the shops. This is the book made famous by Noel Edmonds's admission that he used it to get his dearest wishes granted.

Of the six wishes he made last March (he wrote them down and put the list under his pillow), four were delivered by October, one being a house in the sun (in the south of France) and another a new challenge (a Channel 4 daytime game show, Deal or No Deal). The astrologer Jonathan Cainer has declared that the book is compatible with his own approach to horoscopes.

Inevitably, the result of these celebrity endorsements has been to excite a frenzy of consumer interest.

The Cosmic Ordering Service, published in 1999 by the German New Age author Barbel Mohr, makes wish-fulfilment seem so simple that you could kick yourself for not having thought of it first. Essentially, you decide what it is you want, when you want. You announce your wishes mentally to the universe, confidently expecting that it will listen. And you wait for the cosmos to deliver. The drawback is that, as Miss Mohr, 42, insists, "it only works with a pure, childlike and innocent feeling, and the more crazy and playful the method, the more successful it is". Oh, and you mustn't go on and on about your wishes; once will do. As the author observes: "You were heard first time."

So there you have it. It's a bit like positive thinking, but instead of standing before the mirror, announcing, "Every day, in every way, I get better and better", you put in an order to the universe. The author describes the working of her principle thus: "When you order with the cosmos, you connect yourself additionally with what others call 'united field theory' and others 'morphogenetic field' or 'Akasha Chronicle'. One assumes that basically everything is one and that you are able to connect with the power of the entirety." A bit like Spinoza, then.

It all seems perfectly plausible, even if you don't quite buy the underlying philosophy. I mean, if you expect a particular outcome, you're quite likely to behave in a way that brings it about. Think of those women who regard themselves as being really sexy: by virtue of their sheer self-confidence, they do indeed pull.

Miss Mohr's website is full of testimonials to the virtues of cosmic ordering. Indeed, the one thing that strikes me about it is how very modest most people's wishes are. One woman procured an espresso-making machine to please her mother-in-law (she entered a crossword puzzle with an espresso machine as the prize). Another wanted a pet, but was allergic to cats and dogs. She put in a cosmic order and, a couple of days later, a non-allergenic kitten pitched up at her door. As for Miss Mohr's own wish-list, it once included an order to the cosmos to be able to get her washing into the most effective machine in a public laundry.
- Source: Make a wish and pester the cosmos, Telegraph, UK, Apr. 8, 2006

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This post was last updated: Aug. 1, 2007