The Assembly – The Assemblies of George & Betty Geftakys

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George Geftakys Assembly Ministry

“The Assemblies” currently consist of about a dozen small Christian gatherings, mostly in the U.S., that were founded by George Geftakys, beginning in 1971.

In 2002, there were more than fifty Assemblies world-wide. Most of them disbanded in 2003 following the revelation of Mr. Geftakys’ sexual involvement with women in the group and the cover-up of his son’s long history of domestic violence.
– Source: The Assemblies of George & Betty Geftakys: Introduction to the Ministryoffsite [Contra]


  • Abusive Churches Will Always Existoffsite Chapter 11 in Ronald Enroth’s book, Churches That Abuse, deals with George Geftakys’ “Assembly”
  • The Irons’ History of the Geftakys Assembly Ministryoffsite by Margaret Irons

    How did a man like George Geftakys gain credibility and a following, in spite of contrary indications? This the Irons’ perspective, beginning with how they met the Geftakys’s in Southern California in 1969. Brinda McCumber gives another perspective from Illinois in Midwest and Tuscola History. Note: Although the Geftakys ministry known as the Assembly was based on early Plymouth Brethren principles, taught early PB doctrine and used PB language, there was never any connection with Brethren assemblies other than George’s previous association with them for 15 years or so.

Web Sites

  • Reflections on the Assembly, and elements of spiritual abuseoffsite [Contra]

    We’ve tried to put together as complete a picture as possible of the Assembly ministry of George and Betty Geftakys, covering its origin and history, its teaching and practice, the final weeks, the current status of groups still meeting independently, and personal stories of former members.

    Some folks will feel that this website puts the Assembly in too harsh a light, and fails to emphasize the positive aspects. The use of the word ‘cult’ may be particularly offensive. Others will feel the opposite. We have tried to be objective, but whether we have succeeded or not, the information on this site is a key element in healing from damages done. Take what seems true to you and is helpful, and leave the rest. Certain things may make more sense to you later.

    Spiritual abuse, in various forms, is not uncommon among Christian gatherings and ministries, unfortunately. The Elements of Spiritual Abuse section of the website covers subjects including how to identify abusive churches and Christian leaders, unethical influence and mind control, clergy sexual abuse, and psychopathology, particularly narcissism. Articles and resources on this site pertain to many legalistic and/or abusive Christian groups.
    – Source: About us and this siteoffsite

See Also

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This post was last updated: Mar. 21, 2010